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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
there are three exceptions -- uc-berkeley, ucla, the university of michigan, they did not garner the same amount of racial and ethnic diversity using alternatives. but what is notable is that those three universities are the ones that are most likely to draw on a national pool of applicants, which means that the number of black and hispanic students is likely to be depressed for an artificial reason. these are the schools that have to compete with other schools on an unfair playing field against competitors who are free to continue to use racial preferences in admissions. so a highly talented students of color who gets into uc-berkeley without a racial preference is also likely to be admitted to an even more competitive institution like stanford with a racial preference. it is not surprising that university of michigan, uc- berkeley, and ucla are having a harder time achieving racial and ethnic diversity than some of these other institutions which do not to the same extent drawn national poll. what about graduate school? rick sander is here from ucla law school. we will hear from him about the p
students at ucla with large preferences who have a 90% chance of congratulating the only 50% chance of passing the bar. welcome. so that i cumulatively meant that only 45% of the students with large preferences that were admitting went on to go through law school and get their degrees. it wasn't hard to look at the schools and los angeles where the students with preferences would have gotten in without preference to see that those students seemed to have much better outcomes so i started looking into this and looked for the databases that could help test it, and by 2004, 2005, developed the paper that we first discussed this in the context and found that this was quite a large problem that nationally the great bulk of the minority students especially african-american students were not receiving very large preference is typically on a scale of a couple hundred s.a.t. points or ten to 15 that the traits were generally very poor for this group only about one-third starting infil law school in early 2000 were graduating and passing the bar on their first attempt. this was affecting the
of ucla and spent time with the cowboys and has yet to kick an until regular season field- goal. the vikes. but the big question is who is playing under center? we saw what happened with rg3 and is, third quarter, suffering a concussion and forced to leave the game. he needs to be cleared by an independent neurologist to play against minnesota. if he can not go, curt cousins will get the start. the fourth round draft pick out of michigan state replaced the injured griffin on sunday and he through a 77-yard touchdown pass and two late inner is tensions. entersessions. how does the head coach feel about the backups? kissins and grossman. >> i have the conference in both guys and that is a great feeling to have a lot of times you feel good about one but not two. so, i probably have the best situation i have been in in a long time. >> maybe there is a heightened sense of, you know, a need to be ready, but, i feel like i have had to be ready all of the other weeks and needed to be ready this past weekend and that won't change. >> reporter: we'll know more about rg3' status tomorrow. a taste of
fewer african-americans at berkeley and ucla. when racial preferences were admitted -- this was not actually about outcome. those students who had been admitted to berkeley and ucla were going to school and had higher success rates and because berkeley and ucla afforded so many minority students with a national reputation to do so the race neutrality increased the integration across campuses. one of the things we talk about in the book is the cascade effect. when elite universities admit students, a four paid graphic in the book illustrates this. have the first pick and the students there would like to admit through preference. so they admit not only the very top african-american, hispanic, they also admit those in second, third and fourth tiers of academic achievement. that means when the second tier schools use preferences they start far down the ladder. ironically that means the largest preferences are not used by the most elite schools but schools that are in the third or fourth tier of all colleges. this is important for couple reasons. when is it helps explain
competitive institution like stanford is not surprising as the receipt of uc-berkeley, ucla are having a harder time achieving racial and ethnic diversity than some of these other institutions would still not end to the same extent drawn national poll. what about graduates jack ray sanders is here from ucla law school and all your little bit from the program that he said the letter. ucla has of strong program of providing a leggett to economically disadvantaged students. you can see in the data that if you look at african-american students 22 of 63 under the socio-economic program, the economic disadvantage to students. compared to only 12 out of 382 who were admitted through other programs. that is to say, more african-american students were admitted through the socio-economic program than the regular program even though the socio-economic program a much smaller. overall, if you look at the results that ucla law school, 56 percent of the students admitted through socioeconomic affirmative action or black or hispanic compared to just 6 percent of those not admitted through those progra
that it was not a prank. he will share the $1.2 million prize with a ucla professor they both did work on mathematics in supplying the principles of supply and demand in innovative ways they are the upper seventies for san leandro. meet a is for walnut creek. pittsburgh 85 degrees and alameda gets to a comfortable 75 degrees. of our friends in the north bay to match their mid '80s of novato. 82 in san raphael 82 in petaluma. ocean beach 66 degrees in downtown san francisco a nice pleasant 74 degrees. here's a look at your 7 day her around the bay forecast. we are warming things up tomorrow and thursday. thursday looks great! light summer conditions. plenty of fault in some areas of morning fog. here's a look at traffic with erica. good morning. >> the morning and i look at any hot spots around the bay area. no major accidents. over the right road work is what we are contending with. widespread no issues to contend with in terms of visibility here. again that drive is 9 minutes from the foot of the maze approaching fremont street this morning. here to san live look shows traffic conditions equal in bo
do that. watch ucla beat cal. >> plenty. >> rosemary is working on a nice forecast tonight? >> bring along the jacket, make sure kids are bundled up. we are expecting an on show breeze, partly cloudy skies, and with the breeze begins to blow it, cools things down. which means if you head into the city, expect the same. outside the doors, partly cloudy skies, fog reported over part of the north bay valley locations as well as areas near the golden gate, and low clouds have slipped into the bay. partly cloudy skies, and a slightly cooler day. 71 for santa rows tax 70 degrees for mountain view, low to mid-60s in the city of san francisco. at some point, some scat may enter the picture -- some scattered showers may enter the picture. we get into monday night, maybe a few sprinkles over tahoe, occasions of the system off the coast, moving -- occasions of the system off the coast moving in. we are still from too to four -- two to four days out. looks like the best shot, temperatures not budging a lot. low to mid-70s in the forecast inland. low 70s at the coast. >>> just a few hours, the op
of stable allocations and the practice of market design, one is a harvard gentleman, the other ucla. steve liesman passed over again, you look at the politicization of the way the nobel peace prize is handed out. >> there were questions last week after that was given to the european union. >> it was like a mirror on the cover of "time," you are the person of the -- once everybody's the person of the year, does it mean anything after that? and if they give it to the eu, who gets it, is cuba getting it next year? it doesn't seem -- >> although they could use the money. >> exactly. >>> steve liesman has breaking comments from new york fed president william dudley. steve? >> thanks, becky. bill dudley president of the new york fed really coming down and explaining some of the recent fed policy moves and suggesting that they will be around for a while, saying the main reason for economic underperformance is lack of demand. the u.s. recovery he says is weak in part because of a weak global recovery, also talking about negative feedback loops, once things get bad, they stay bad and he's saying th
schaaply of ucla. margaret knows who these people are. maybe she can tell us a little bit. >> no, i don't. >> we'll look into that and find out what they did. they just won a big prize. a record setting night for aaron rodgers. he threw a career high six touchdown passes last night as green bay handed the houston texans their first loss of the season 42-24. only one team left, the atlanta falcons. the falcons are now a perfect 6-0. the only undid you feeted team. talk about having a nose for the football. check out nfl network reporter ian rapport, a new reporter doing a live sideline report this weekend. you can say he took one for the team. >> all of a sudden there really have been questions about this defense which is ranked 21st. i had an interesting talk with offensive coordinator -- with -- did you guys just see that football? >> i saw it. >> anyway. anyway. >> that's live tv, folks. keeps right on going. hit by a football in the face and delivers the rest of the report. we're on your side, sir. well done. >> that was well done. all right, john, thank you. >>> former senator arlen
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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